USCA Sidecar Forum

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Sidecar turns

Hi Again Steve:
The wobble thing - That can sometimes be reduced or eliminated without the steering damper. Jack up the rig so the front wheel is just off the ground. Tighten the steering head bearings until the front end falls gently, slowly to the side. This works better if the steering head bearings are tapered bearings but I believe it will work for ball bearings too. I have used this method on my rigs. I have found that the steering damper only adds to the effort required to steer - which is already too much.

soupy1957 - 11/26/2017 9:44 AM

.......... So if the dealer where I bought my motorcycle, wants to sell Royal Enfield leather jackets for $300.00, they have every right to! But a savvy consumer, will do their homework first, and pay $189 online!!

You do not know dealer where you bought your motorcycle has to pay for showroom where you bought motorcycle, insurance,lights, heating and cooling, advertising, tax for inventory and many other payments and taxes you
do not want to know.

Low speed wobble is a physical effect that will always happen. Dampeners only help to shade its severity.
go slower or faster, DO NOT STICK TO THAT WOBBLE SPEED.

And never take off the hand at wobble speed. I kicked my wrist once that bad it took 3-4 days to get back to normal.

Wobble speed changes with loading and up or down driving. On very steep downhill any concrete speed *bum*p will cause strong shakes. (I mean with steep terrains slopes where many of you will not even walk.)
Sven

PS: Sorry sirs of server's spelling autocorrection. Today my limit of autocorrection ran over...lost hours of work earlier in the day. That automatic elimination of the word *bum*p* and others is distracting and disturbs. Specially nasty, when in one writing you need to mix languages.
Excuse me, but I needed to bleed off my quote of pressure and incomprehension of modern programmers thinking ( aimed to Apple)

All I’m saying is, I won’t pay his prices; no matter HOW much I may sympathize with how tough it is on private businesses these days. Heck, I just spent $10,000.00 for a brand new bike from him! He should GIVE me a leather jacket!!

Your Post#1:
When entering a right hand turn, with an American motorcycle/sidecar setup, (sidecar on the right side)is it safer to drop down early into the turn, following the inside track of the turn, or to swing wide initially, and cut down into the turn, later?? (Assuming a slow to moderate speed in the approach). Which way will yield the safest results without “flying the car?”

Response to #1:
The best way to enter a right hand turn is to do your braking before the turn. Enter the turn at a spped you are comfortable with according to your present skill level.
Enter the turn up high by the centerline.
Go for a late apex (this means you enter high and exit low)
Once you 'turn in' you are done braking and can gradually pick up the throttle.
If you practice this technique you will find that in time your speed will magically increase as your experience grows and you become more 'one with the machine'.
The high entry allows you to see farther through the turn which is a good thing. You can better detect whether it is a consistant sweeper or a turn with a decreasing radius. A good view also may tip you off of any other hazards that would not be seen if you entered low.
Entering high and shooting for a late apex also gives you more 'wiggle room' on exit which can be benifical.
Entering low and all of a sudden finding you are in a decreasing radius turn or there is a tree laying in the road or a huge rock is in your path can create some pucker moments or worse that do nothing for your fun meter an can potentially be a disaster.

Do not worry about speed at first ...if you practice good technique you will find, in time, that your speed will increase . However, with that being said, it is impossible to increase one's skill envelope if they do not practice (IN A SAFE PLACE) a little at a time above their current comfort zone.

I will address the so called 'flying the chair' question in a following response hang tight lol.

Predecessor to 'the yellow book' i.E. Riding a Sidecar Outfit. Same author almost same content as far as most
riding instruction goes . Click here: http://welcome-ural.ru/documents/HowToRideUral.pdf

“Flying the chair” must be BRUTAL on the tire bead and tread, yes????

Steve,
much worse spokes and frame!

The MZ rig during study time need every 3-5 month a pry bar treatment due to my pirouettes.
Take into account that all bikes are designed to take force vertically through the centre line. On the rig ALL side forces go via a long lever around the centre of gravity. Which by the way changes with every of your movements. On such a light weight rig like yours (and my first 2) the weight shifting effect is tremendous and permits us to steer even on ice, snow, gravel and mud where others will go into the ditch without hope.

Soupy question #2:I have heard a few times now, from different individuals, that you should learn how to lift your side car. Why is that important? Wouldn’t I want to avoid that at all costs?
.....................................................................................................................................................................
Response to post @2.
EVERYONE HERE HAS AN OPPORTUNITY TO EXPAND THEIR PERSONAL SKILL ENVELOPE. We should all take that statement to heart. We can plan our actions but not our reactions! Good reactions are something that can potentially save our butt as well as our family, friends and anyone that may be riding with us. So, how do we expand our reactions? practicing a little at a time above our present comfort zones.
As far as the chair coming up it can happen on any rig but does so much easier on some than others.
The objective when in a turn is to complete the turn safely. The first 'reaction' that someone has to the sidecar wheel coming up is typically to steer away from the turn to bring it back down, This is NOT good thing as it will so many time allow the rig to go in tje direction the bats have been turned to. Th objective is to make the corner safely and crossing the center line is only going to produce a failing grade which can have some very serious and sad results. YOU need to complete the rurn..period!! .

claude #3563 - 11/28/2017 7:42 PM

Your Post#1:
When entering a right hand turn, with an American motorcycle/sidecar setup, (sidecar on the right side)is it safer to drop down early into the turn, following the inside track of the turn, or to swing wide initially, and cut down into the turn, later?? (Assuming a slow to moderate speed in the approach). Which way will yield the safest results without “flying the car?”

Response to #1:
The best way to enter a right hand turn is to do your braking before the turn. Enter the turn at a spped you are comfortable with according to your present skill level.
Enter the turn up high by the centerline.
Go for a late apex (this means you enter high and exit low)
Once you 'turn in' you are done braking and can gradually pick up the throttle.
If you practice this technique you will find that in time your speed will magically increase as your experience grows and you become more 'one with the machine'.
The high entry allows you to see farther through the turn which is a good thing. You can better detect whether it is a consistant sweeper or a turn with a decreasing radius. A good view also may tip you off of any other hazards that would not be seen if you entered low.
Entering high and shooting for a late apex also gives you more 'wiggle room' on exit which can be benifical.
Entering low and all of a sudden finding you are in a decreasing radius turn or there is a tree laying in the road or a huge rock is in your path can create some pucker moments or worse that do nothing for your fun meter an can potentially be a disaster.

Do not worry about speed at first ...if you practice good technique you will find, in time, that your speed will increase . However, with that being said, it is impossible to increase one's skill envelope if they do not practice (IN A SAFE PLACE) a little at a time above their current comfort zone.

I will address the so called 'flying the chair' question in a following response hang tight lol.

GREAT stuff!!!!!