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right turns

Yes Jeff that is what I meant, you got it. Like they would teach motorcycle races years ago Straighten out the curve as much as you can for speed it was game years ago.Rudyr

I've gotten into the habit of hanging off slightly when riding the twisties, just in case. Doesn't take much to hang all but my left bun off, putting almost all my 165 lbs on the right foot peg. Makes a real difference at keeping the sidecar down. I do the same thing when turning left as the thought of having the rear cycle tire leave the ground is not a pleasant one. One can "fly" the car with a little practice, but as of yet I've never heard of anyone to can "fly" the rear tire on the cycle. Should that happen, I don't think it would end well.

Now for those left turns I still load the front wheel but uses littel rear brake. With Down shift and some throttel. Now try this on wet grass turn hard to left and a lot for rear brake with a littel speed (that’s drifting) that’s what your rear wheel want’s to do on dry pavement. don’t try that on dry pavement you could flip the whole rig and end up with the gas cap on belle button.Rudyr

Very interesting discussion, Folks! Even though I am on my second outfit,that I have set up, and have been driving sidecars for over 7 years, it seems I always pick up some important tid-bit of information ,every time I browse through this great forum!

below is one example of  very useful info. from Jay at DMC :

"Tilt was not intended to be used to transfer weight for cornering, it is intended as a trim device to trim for load, road, weather and speed conditions. If you feel that when the is trimmed to go straight down the road properly that the sidecar wants to lift to easy then you should be either adding ballast or increasing track width. Ballast is a lot simpler then changing track width".

I always thought that its best to set the rig up as narrow as possible, so it would exert less "leverage" on the bike during both acceleration,and braking, not to mention fitting through tighter spaces in traffic, etc. That being said, I always strived to make my rig as narrow as possible. Now I realize that track width is another tool at our disposal to adjust the stability of the rig, and in some cases, going wider is better.

I have a Guzzi California II automatic that weighs about 550 lbs, I weigh 190 lbs, and my texas Ranger weighs about 180 lbs.

Any idea what average track width should be set at?  I am currently at 53" measuring from the center line of both tires. I have 50 lbs of lead ballast, but am thinking that if  I increase the track width I may be able to reduce the need for ballast.

What are the groups thoughts? How much track width is "too much"?

Thanks alot

Rick. D.

Quote from Bigbikerrick on December 5, 2019, 1:48 pm

... Guzzi California II automatic that weighs about 550 lbs, I weigh 190 lbs, and my texas Ranger weighs about 180 lbs....

track width.... currently at 53" measuring from the center line of both tires. I have 50 lbs of lead ballast....

Rick, I ran a Ranger mounted on a ±530 lbs Sportster + me at'bout 160 lbs with a 54" track width, generally riding with permanent ballast plus tools of not less than 40 lbs. This set-up handled well, but did require "attention" in right corners.  This combination was more settled with 120+ lb load in the sidecar.

Lee Summer Grove, LA R1100GS/CSM Sidecar, Burgman/Texas Ranger, Zuma 50F, MB5, TW200, CRF250L