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Riding the great divide (usa)

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Has anyone ridden the great divide using a sidecar outfit? I would appreciate any info on the outfit and how difficult it was.

I plan to ride the CDT on my KLR rig right after the USCA rally in July. There was guy who did it on his Ural a year or two back, Here is a link to his story on Soviet Steeds. http://www.sovietsteeds.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29561&p=359248&hilit=Continental+Divide#p359248 What rig are you thinking of riding it on? CCjon

What is great divide?

The Continental Divide Trail from Mexico to Canada was laid out by bicycle rider s number of years ago. The trail has been modified for motorcycles since there were sections where even the bicyclists had to carry their bikes over the boulders. The trail now has easy and difficult sections for dual sport motor bikes. Takes about 10-15 days to do the Trail. Camping most of the way.

That is the only great divide ride I know of, unless he is referring to the TransAmerica Trail going East - West.

CCjon - 1/6/2016 10:29 PM

The Continental Divide Trail from Mexico to Canada was laid out by bicycle rider s number of years ago. The trail has been modified for motorcycles since there were sections where even the bicyclists had to carry their bikes over the boulders. The trail now has easy and difficult sections for dual sport motor bikes. Takes about 10-15 days to do the Trail. Camping most of the way.

That is the only great divide ride I know of, unless he is referring to the TransAmerica Trail going East - West.  

 

Indeed that' s the correct name for it. Thanks for the info. My wife and I are considering riding it this year. We will need to get a ring first though. Any suggestions?

extreme10 - 1/7/2016 2:11 AM Indeed that' s the correct name for it. Thanks for the info. My wife and I are considering riding it this year. We will need to get a ring first though. Any suggestions?

You'll want good ground clearance, light to medium weight, good range between fuel stops. As Jay of DMC would insist, a brake on the sidecar wheel.

It's not a speed race so gear down for climbing and crawling over loose rocks on the inclines and descents, but also long flat gravel sections, possible mud.

Don't go too early, wait until all the passes are snow free.

Extreme10, I rode the CDT in my BMW 1150GS rig from Banff to Jackson WY three years ago. Very doable as long as you avoid Fleecer. Ride Report Link

Another member, Strong Bad, ran the whole thing from South to North two summers ago in his 1200GS rig. Ride Report Link

VLAD - 1/6/2016 7:17 PM

What is great divide?

Further explanation VLAD and nothing to to with the trail or the trip itself is to consider the continental divide this way- on the east side, all rivers and tributaries flow east to the Atlantic eventually and on the west side, all rivers and tributaries flow west to the Pacific.

In our country I can see the sunrise on the Caribbean coast have lunch on the divide and have dinner at sunset at the Pacific easily. Never done though yet. (part of the bucket list like a full turn around)
But a ride on top of the divide from North to South would be a life threatening several month walk.
Several years ago I met in Monteverde a group of biologic investigators who made a 80km direct walk on top of the rim from San Ramon...They needed 8 days with the help of a specially trained guide.
The continental divide I can see through the office window. Only 7-8km straight line to the next 2980m top where I went with my wife when she was pregnant with our first daughter.(the eldest dog fainted)
Other countries other challenges.
Sven :O 😉

extreme10 - 1/6/2016 3:58 PM

Has anyone ridden the great divide using a sidecar outfit? I would appreciate any info on the outfit and how difficult it was.

As Drone said, my wife & I did the Continental Divide Ride (CDR) from South to North and we continued on up to Banff after crossing into Canookistan. Drone's link has my ride report (I go by StrongBad on that other site). This was one of THE best trips we've ever done!

You should note that there are more than one routes which can be followed. Jerry Counts has a route he calls "The Great Divide Route" which has a bunch of single track trails and is NOT as sidecar friendly. The Mountain Bike guys do not race on a bunch of technical single track as they need to average 80 miles per day, which on single track would be impossible to do day after day. Over on ADVrider.com there other GPS tracks which follows the CDR route that the bicycle racers do, one of them is by a guy called Cannonshot and the other is called Bigdog. We followed Cannonshot's GPS route but had BigDog's with us just in case we needed an alternate route through. There is also the Continental Divide Trail which is a hiking trail

I would say that we were on dirt 80% of the time and overall it really wasn't very difficult. You don't need a whole bunch of ground clearance, more important to use your brain and pick your lines carefully. There are places where you are waaaaay out in the middle of no where and you should always be able to recognize when and if you are getting in "too deep", and always be able to self extract. The summer so called "Monsoon Season" in New Mexico & Colorado play a huge roll in your ability to use dirt roads. There are places where the mud is so sticky, that it packs in around your wheels, locking them up. It is not uncommon for those doing the CDR to have to re-route around muddy sections. We were extremely lucky as we didn't get a single summer thunder storm until we got all the way up into Canookistan.

Our plan was to camp for 3 nights and every 4th night stay in Motels, do laundry, and re-supply food/water & Scotch. I think we prolly stayed in more motels than expected/planned, but then keeping your navigator happy is THE most important job the pilot has!!!

BTW, last year we did The Heart of the West (aka HoW) which goes through much of the same areas but does a big loop through Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. The HoW loop makes it much easier to choose a more user friendly place to start and stop. My ride report for that trip is here: http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/hacking-our-way-through-the-heart-of-the-west.1090138/

Read through both and I'll be glad to answer any questions!!!!

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