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Mandatory helmet law

I've been riding since the mid "60's". I heard and read, hundreds of thoughts regarding the wearing, and not wearing, of helmets. I've lived in states where helmets were mandatory and in states where they were optional. Personally, I choose and require my passengers to, wear helmets. I don't have the luxury of my hair blowing in the breeze. It's long gone. But, I do have the right to make a choice. My choice. Let common sense prevail so that we don't have states legislating what we should, or should not, wear. Drive smart!! Ride smart!!

I've been riding since the mid "60's". I heard and read, hundreds of thoughts regarding the wearing, and not wearing, of helmets. I've lived in states where helmets were mandatory and in states where they were optional. Personally, I choose and require my passengers to, wear helmets. I don't have the luxury of my hair blowing in the breeze. It's long gone. But, I do have the right to make a choice. My choice. Let common sense prevail so that we don't have states legislating what we should, or should not, wear. Drive smart!! Ride smart!!

the horror stories go on & on...

& the individual's rights arguments are close on their heels

in TEXAS, the option, i believe, comes w/ a proviso

that proviso requires an increased amount of insurance, allegedly, to cover the care for the rider(s) who chose not to wear proper/protective head gear

the above comment about the issue being about money is, probably, the real basis for the laws and not any concern for the welfare of the individual and, certainly, not any wish, by government, to manage/control/restrict individual's rights

SIMPLE ECONOMICS

the less the government has to pay for the care of an accident victim, the less the rest of us have to pay in taxes

SIMPLE ECONOMICS

just this old man's opinion

sw

SW, you hit the nail right on the head!

I agree Steve. It's always about the "doe rae me"!
It seems like a long time ago that I worked for a larger shipping company. (Damn, it was!) As drivers, we were trained to drive safely and responsibly. They had a formula for success that went something like this: 1. Keep your eyes moving. 2. Get the big picture. 3. Make sure THEY see you. 4. Always leave yourself an out. 5. Aim high in steering. To review their formula for driving success, I will go over them, one by one. 1>Keep your eyes moving-Don't stare or focus on one thing. Accidents can happen pretty fast if you don't already know this. 2>Get the big picture-What's going on in front of you, behind you and to either side. 3>Make sure that they see you-Are you wearing reflective clothing. Are your lights on and do they work properly. Use your horn to get their attention. How about eye contact with the driver of that vehicle that wants to pull out in your lane. 4>Leave yourself an out-Did you leave yourself plenty of room to change lanes quickly. It you best bud riding up next to you so that you can't move safely. Are you tail gaiting? (I need a skull and crossbones for that one.) 5>Aim high in steering-Don't look at the road 100' in front of you. Look hundreds of yards ahead and you will find it easier to steer and keep yourself safely in your lane.

"Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out the window."

Baluner1 - 5/13/2014 11:04 AM

I agree Steve. It's always about the "doe rae me"!
It seems like a long time ago that I worked for a larger shipping company. (Damn, it was!) As drivers, we were trained to drive safely and responsibly. They had a formula for success that went something like this: 1. Keep your eyes moving. 2. Get the big picture. 3. Make sure THEY see you. 4. Always leave yourself an out. 5. Aim high in steering. To review their formula for driving success, I will go over them, one by one. 1>Keep your eyes moving-Don't stare or focus on one thing. Accidents can happen pretty fast if you don't already know this. 2>Get the big picture-What's going on in front of you, behind you and to either side. 3>Make sure that they see you-Are you wearing reflective clothing. Are your lights on and do they work properly. Use your horn to get their attention. How about eye contact with the driver of that vehicle that wants to pull out in your lane. 4>Leave yourself an out-Did you leave yourself plenty of room to change lanes quickly. It you best bud riding up next to you so that you can't move safely. Are you tail gaiting? (I need a skull and crossbones for that one.) 5>Aim high in steering-Don't look at the road 100' in front of you. Look hundreds of yards ahead and you will find it easier to steer and keep yourself safely in your lane.

"Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out the window."

not at all different from what i used to teach in DRIVER'S ED, here in TEXAS

always good to have a REMINDER/REFRESHER

thx

sw

At one time I worked in Lewiston, ID and lived in Clarkston, WA. Washington required Helmets and Idaho did not. Both states still follow the same rules. At least once a month one of my coworkers who lived in Idaho would start the argument over me being forced to wear a helmet. He insisted he had his rights. A minor car motorcycle accident left Steve's widow holding onto two small children. The last thing I said to Steve as they lowered him down was "No one is going to make you wear that helmet now".