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Carrying a fire extinguisher

Originally written by maquette on 1/4/2009 1:35 PM

Howard,

Here's my friend's BMW. He didn't have a fire extinguisher, but he did have a camera. :>)

Tom

Sorry, the link won't work. I don't believe that photobucket pictures will open directly into this site.

Originally written by gnm109 on 1/4/2009 5:17 PM

Originally written by maquette on 1/4/2009 1:35 PM

Howard,

Here's my friend's BMW. He didn't have a fire extinguisher, but he did have a camera. :>)

Tom

Sorry, the link won't work. I don't believe that photobucket pictures will open directly into this site.

They will, but you have to choose the HTML Code instead of the IMG code

I don't think my fire extinguisher would help that one.

Ooch! That looks bad. It was too late for a fire extinguisher on that one.

Doesn't look like even a 5 pounder would have slowed that one down.

More better to have good insurance and stay back out of harms way if possible.

Lonnie

I have never seen a sidecar fire I would want to play fireman with, but thankfully all I have seen have been in pics only, so far. Here is one of the more dramatic ones I've seen pictures of. Too bad, as it was a nice looking rig before the fire.

Attached files

At least it didn't hurt the paint job much.

Lonnie

I do recall another bike fire now that I've thought for a while. I was at a so-called "Field Meet" in llinois many years ago. They were having a slow race and one of the bikes, a late 1940's 500cc Matchless single, stalled. The owner was tickling the amal carburetor to get the fuel level up and the gas was apparently overflowing from the bowl as was common on old British bikes.

In kicking it to get it starting again, it snorted back through the carburetor and caught fire. We were essentially out in the woods and, of course, no one had a fire extinguisher.

The bike fell over and was totally consumed. The fire got so hot, it melted the crankcase and the flywheels actually fell down through the frame. When the fire burned out, there was literally nothing left but a charred mess.

Fortunately with modern bikes, especially those with fuel injection, that sort of thing is much less likely. It sure made a great show, however.

Powder fire estinguishers damage the electric system and paint.
so in my shop I have as main estinguisher CO2 plus 2 minor powder estinguishers.
In the trunk of the rig the powder poored twice all over and caused rust.
I'll look for a handy outside holder when I'll repair my boat.

The only ocasion I needed one on a vehicle was on my 1960 Willies when a back blow lightened the carb (1. day on the street after a 1 year rebuild => next day I adapted a modern Chevrolet carb).
The poor man who wanted to help me with his powder estinguisher got a bad grunt and nearly a blow from me and I estinguished it with a natural wool blanket.

As a former Saint John's accident helper I see the need for good preparation always as a good nerve calmer!
Beeing prepared for the worst and hoping for the best is way better then staying beside observing and haveing nothing with what to help.

And thanks God the day you need and have it on hand in deed!
Best regards
Sven

I remembered another fire that my father and I had with his 1965 Ford. We were on a trip and were on the freeway north of Los Angeles. He had the car serviced the previous week with an oil change and a transmission flush.

Apparently the transmission was overfilled with oil since the engine caught fire on the right side near the transmission filler tube. When I managed to get the hood up, I could see that it was burning rather slowly as it was due to a couple of quarts of ATF havnig been blown out on the manifold on the passenger side.

We had no fire extinguisher but fortunately he was a real estate broker and always carried a shovel for putting up signs. I grabbed the shovel out of the trunk and after about five quick tosses of sand and dirt from the side of the road, the fire was out.

There was no permanent damage as it missed the wiring and I got it out quickly. If it had been gasoline rather than ATF, we would have lost the car.

We limped in to the next town and found a self--service car wash and after a few blasts all was well. After losing the excess oil, the transmission was still working OK, too. Another close one.

I also once saw a Harley Knucklehead burn up at a Shell Gas station in Chicago. The owner let 100 octane fuel drip onto the hot engine when he was refueling. It was a total loss. As I said, I think that would be the most common way that a bike could burn.

When I was a representative for an insurance company, I was frequently on the road in California. I saw several Recreational vehicles burn on the road. Apparently they have an issue with the wiring being strung through the metal framework so short circuits can occur when the wires fray. These can and do lead to fires that can't even be put out since they are inside of the frame.

In any case, a fire extinguisher is always a good idea since it will at least give you a chance.

Originally written by gnm109 on 1/6/2009 5:33 PM

When I was a representative for an insurance company, I was frequently on the road in California. I saw several Recreational vehicles burn on the road. Apparently they have an issue with the wiring being strung through the metal framework so short circuits can occur when the wires fray. These can and do lead to fires that can't even be put out since they are inside of the frame.

In any case, a fire extinguisher is always a good idea since it will at least give you a chance.

I worked for a time at a Winnebago Dealer. We frequently saw fires caused by idiot owners leaving a propane refrigerator running or trying to cook breakfast while driving down the highway. :0)